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CALIFORNIA
STRIPED BASS
ASSOCIATION

The California Striped Bass Association originated with a Chapter in Stockton, California on April 14, 1974. Since then, chapters have been established in Modesto, West Delta, Rio Vista, Sacramento, Lodi, and Fresno. A State Board, which is composed of three members from each chapter, is the governing body for all seven chapters.

The chapters have activities throughout the year for members such as derbies, pot luck dinners, picnics, workshops, seminars and fundraising activities.

A monthly bulletin is sent to each member informing them of the monthly general meeting, the program, matters of interest affecting the fisher, chapter activities and a fishing report. Meetings vary with guest speakers, films, and fishing seminars. Each chapter conducts or participates in free children's fishing days or derbies. Some chapters grant scholarships for students studying for careers in fish and wildlife vocations.

CSBA works with other fishing groups on legislative matters affecting the fishery, water quality problems, etc. We also work with the California Department of Fish and GAme and state legislators making our ideas, views, and suggestions known.

Our MOTTO "Dedicated to the Preservation, Conservation and Enhancement of Striped Bass" means that although we enjoy our sportfishing, we want to protect and enhance our fishery to insure that future generations will have a chance of catching this great sport fish... the STRIPED BASS

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FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO THE DECLINE OF THE STRIPED BASS

  • State & Federal water pumping facilities
  • Water Diversions
  • Pollution-Industrial & Agricultural
  • Poaching

WORKING TOWARD THE SOLUTION

CSBA was instrumental in obtaining legislation which authorized the STRIPED BASS STAMP. This stamp supported the striper hatchery program among other projects. Millions of hatchery-reared striped bass were released in the Sacramento/San Joaquin delta system. In 1992 the planting program was discontinued by order of the Director of the Department of Fish and GAme due to possible effect on winter-run salmon. CSBA and many other experts do not agree with this order. CSBA's members got together with the "NO FISH -NO STAMP" petitions and the stamp has been pulled. We have high hopes that the stamp will be reinstated.

An Aquatic Toxicology Laboratory was opened at the Elk Grove, CA hatchery. This lab generated information for setting water quality standards and is partially funded by the stripped bass stamp.

Some of the other programs that are being funded with remaining funds by the striped bass stamp are:

  • Increased enforcement of striped bass regulations.
  • Provides game wardens with different types of special equipment to be used for striped bass regulation enforcement.
  • Funds studies of the striped bass, plus many other programs.

THE STRIPED BASS

For those of you just getting started in the thrill of striper fishing-a few facts from the Department of Fish and Game.

Stripers were introduced to California from the East Coast in 1879. They are migratory. Most adults after spawning in the San Joaquin Delta & upper Sacrament River move into the brackish & salt water for summer & fall. Many feed from the San Francisco Bay to Tomales Bay Food in the San Francisco Bay is mainly anchovies, shiner perch and herring. In the Delta area threadfin shad & smaller fish are the main food. In late fall & winter some fish move upstream to the fresh water in the Delta & lower Sacramento River.

Stripers spawn in water 61-69 degrees from April thru mid-June. About one third of the spawning takes place in the San Joaquin River between the Antioch Bridge & the mouth of Middle River. The other two thirds spawn in the Sacramento River between Sacramento & Colusa. These rivers are critical to the spawn.

THE LAST 30 YEARS

In the early 1960's the striped bass count was approximately 3 million adult fish.

By the early 1990's the striped bass count was approximately 775 thousand adult fish. Approximately 30% of these fish were hatchery reared.

PROBLEMS AFFECTING STRIPED BASS POPULATIONS

Listed in general order of importance.

  1. Delta Water Diversions: The State Water Project and The Federal Central Valley Projects.
  2. Reduced Delta Outflows.
  3. Water Pollution, Toxic  Chemicals and Trace Elements
  4. Dredging and Soil Disposal
  5. Illegal Take and Poaching.
  6. Exotic Aquatic Organisms
  7. Bay-Fill Projects
  8. Commercial Bay Shrimp Fishery.
  9. Annual Summer Die-Off of Bass
  10. Diseases and Parasites

PLEASE HELP US TO RESTORE THE FISHERIES NOW & FOR GENERATIONS TO COME
CALL 1-888-333-2722

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